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Muscular strength as a strong predictor of mortality, not just in the elderly

There is a plethora of evidence regarding the need for muscular mass and strength in the elderly population, to combat sarcopenia and reduced functional capacity1. With this in mind researchers are looking into the effect of muscle mass and strength on other chronic disease conditions. They are also trying to elucidate the protective physiology muscular strength and mass.

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Does Sleep Loss Cause Weight Gain?

Psychologist Michael Breus, PhD, makes this case in his book “The Sleep Doctor’s Diet Plan: Lose Weight Through Better Sleep.” There is a well established correlation between reduced sleep hours and higher body mass index

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Tendinitis is not tendinitis

Did you know that more than 80% of the scientific literature on tendinitis has been published in the past 20 years? Our understanding of this condition has improved in important ways.

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Improving Life for People with COPD

COPD affects the lives of roughly 5% of the population.1 It stands for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. COPD is more of a catchall term encompassing chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and/or asthma. In medical writings, sometimes the terms CAO (chronic airflow obstruction) or CAL (chronic airflow limitation) are preferred. Whatever you call it, the condition can severely limit a person’s life.

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A Silent Disease is on the Rise - 23 SEPT

Osteoporosis is often called a silent disease because there are no symptoms until a bone is broken. Osteoporosis means “porous bone”. The disease is on the rise, so let’s take a moment to talk about risks, prevention, and recognition.

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The Compex

The Complex is a portable muscle stimulation device. It is often used for pain relief, to prevent muscle loss after injury or surgery, and to improve muscle strength.

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Physical activity and pregnancy

Physical activity is important during all stages of our lives. Exercise during pregnancy and in the postpartum period has been shown to have numerous health benefits for the mother and her baby

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Load Management

It is thought that both overtraining and undertraining will result in increased injury risk, reduced fitness and poor team performance (Gabbett, 2016). The ability to effectively plan and manage training quantities, frequencies and intensities will have a large effect on the factors above (Brukner et al., 2017).

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Rotator Cuff Tears

Which Patients Are More Likely to Succeed with Conservative Treatment? Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain and may occur without traumatic injury

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Tips for Winter Sport

In order to succeed this winter sport season, you need to be prepared. In this blog we talk about some of the different ways you can get the most out of your body, while reducing your risk of injury.

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Earlier Physiotherapy Improves Outcomes in Nontraumatic Knee Pain

Abstract: A recent study finds that physiotherapy within two weeks of a medical consult for nontraumatic knee pain correlates with reduced healthcare utilisation compared to no physiotherapy. Early physiotherapy reduces the chance of narcotic-taking by 33% and reduces the chance of surgery by 42%. Earlier referrals reduced the risks better than later referrals. The current study adds to a body of evidence demonstrating that earlier referrals to physiotherapy achieve better outcomes.

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Hamstring Strains: Risk Factors and the Rehab Program with Zero Reinjuries

Hamstring strains rank among the most common injuries in high-speed running sports. With recurrence rates ranging between 20% and 33%,1-3 even with rehabilitation, interest in improving outcomes continues. Doctors frequently prescribe physiotherapy but with little official guidance on whom to refer, when to refer, or what to look for in rehabilitation programs.

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The Most Effective Rehabilitation for Cervical Radiculopathy

October 2017 Abstract: Participants in a recent study of rehabilitation for cervical radiculopathy (CR) realised a 60% improvement in pain at four weeks and an 88% improvement in pain at eight weeks. While previous studies show rehabilitation helping patients with CR, the combined manual therapy and exercise therapy approach used in the current study may have resulted in outcomes improved over what is often seen.

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Earlier Physiotherapy Equals Faster Recovery In Acute Muscle Strain

Occasionally, patients with acute conditions may consider delaying physiotherapy. They commonly consider two rationales. One, there is concern that rehab during an acute injury phase may interfere with the initial healing response. Two, economic considerations tempt patients to see if their injuries can heal sufficiently without rehab, before electing physiotherapy. In truth, for many diagnoses, both of these rationales prove counterproductive.

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The Clinical Course of Neck Pain

A recent study correlates muscle-fat infiltration of multifidi with decreased physical ability among seniors with low back pain (LBP). This adds to previous studies finding that asymmetrical multifidus atrophy predicts low back pain recurrence and that lower muscle quality predicts decreased physical function among people without LBP. The persistence of multifidus atrophy and fat infiltration, even among so-called spontaneous resolvers, and its causal role in chronicity underscore the importance of active approaches toward LBP treatment.

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Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome The Evidence in Sum

Current evidence reveals that patellofemoral pain syndrome is common and exhibits a strong tendency toward chronicity. Targeted quadricep strengthening appears to be the most validated intervention at present, but evidence is building in support of other strengthening and stretching. Referrals for organised exercise intervention appear to add to the results of usual care plus patient education.

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Achilles Tendinopathy Improved by Foot Orthotics: Proving the Concept

Custom-made, semi-rigid foot orthotics have been shown to relieve Achilles tendinosis symptoms up to 92% within one month. The exact mechanism by which this relief is achieved has been largely theoretical. The first-ever investigation of foot orthotics and Achilles tendon loading finds that orthotics significantly reduce the load on the tendon, the duration of maximum load, and the rate at which that load is applied.

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Physiotherapy Helps Fall Risk Even with Osteoarthritis of the Knee

The extent to which painful osteoarthritis of the knee can prevent physiotherapy from reducing fall risk has been a subject of ongoing research. A recent review and meta-analysis concludes that certain physiotherapy approaches can reduce fall risk 55% - even in the presence of painful osteoarthritis of the knee.

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First-Line Treatment for Tennis Elbow- Physiotherapy Preferred

Tennis elbow recurrence rates have been measured as high as 72% at one year - especially if patients were treated with corticosteroids. A study out of the University of Queensland earlier this year shows that physiotherapy proves the most cost-effective means for improving quality of life, compared to placebo or corticosteroid as first-line interventions. Combining corticosteroid with physiotherapy may negate the positive effects of physiotherapy. One-year recurrence rates with physiotherapy alone have been measured between 5% and 8%.

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Exercise with Your Dog

Many people find that dogs are their perfect exercise partners. There’s some science and data to explain why this relationship works. Here’s some good reasons to make your dog part of your exercise routine.

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Ice Baths

There are a lot of theories out there, but most have to do with exposure to cold temperatures constricting blood supply to your lower extremities (lower body).

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Losing Weight on the Anti-Gravity Treadmill

Walking and running are great ways to exercise. Because they are weightbearing exercises they are great for bone health and joint health. They can be a great cardiovascular workout and can burn calories and assist with weight loss.

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The IOC consensus statement on youth athletic development

Even though the benefits of physical activity for young people is unquestioned, implementing widespread sustainable and fun participation and success is still challenging. These challenges present for all stakeholders including coaches, parents, and most importantly the athlete themselves. It is complicated by gender issues, variance in biological maturity, and therefore different responses to training, very injury types and risks, and different psychological needs

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The Real Cause of Many Sports Injuries

Why can one person compete in an Ironman triathlon without injury while person of the same gender and age can become injured from a short run? Why do so many injuries occur at the beginning of the season? Why are there sudden increases in injury rates after increasing intensity? Why do some teams seem more injury-proof than others? Why in the clinic do we now see more injuries in teenagers that we did 20 years ago?

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Cancer & Exercise

Cancer is a major public health concern in Australia. One in two Australians over the age of 85 years will develop cancer.1 Causes of cancer are multifactorial. Participating in exercise can assist with reducing the likelihood of the development of cancer (particularly breast and colorectal cancers). Exercise has also been associated with benefits during and following treatment of cancer.2

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