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The IOC consensus statement on youth athletic development

Even though the benefits of physical activity for young people is unquestioned, implementing widespread sustainable and fun participation and success is still challenging. These challenges present for all stakeholders including coaches, parents, and most importantly the athlete themselves. It is complicated by gender issues, variance in biological maturity, and therefore different responses to training, very injury types and risks, and different psychological needs

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The Real Cause of Many Sports Injuries

Why can one person compete in an Ironman triathlon without injury while person of the same gender and age can become injured from a short run? Why do so many injuries occur at the beginning of the season? Why are there sudden increases in injury rates after increasing intensity? Why do some teams seem more injury-proof than others? Why in the clinic do we now see more injuries in teenagers that we did 20 years ago?

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Cancer & Exercise

Cancer is a major public health concern in Australia. One in two Australians over the age of 85 years will develop cancer.1 Causes of cancer are multifactorial. Participating in exercise can assist with reducing the likelihood of the development of cancer (particularly breast and colorectal cancers). Exercise has also been associated with benefits during and following treatment of cancer.2

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Patellofemoral Pain

In July, the British Journal of Sports Medicine published the consensus statement of the 5th International Patellofemoral Pain Research Symposium which was led by Dr. Natalie Collins of The University of Queensland.1 Our own practice principal, Cameron Bulluss, attended the after conference

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Benefits of Exercise and Choices on Aging

It is common to see 2 people of the same age and have them look more than 10 years different. A lot of things are responsible for this including genetics, but we know one thing for sure, the person who exercise and makes good dietary and other health choices is going to look younger than the one who does not

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Preventing Hamstring Strains

People who are in running sports are particularly prone to these, particularly AFL and soccer. They can leave you out for up to 3 months and once you have had a hamstring tear your risk of reinjury is relatively high.

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The effectiveness of pre-activity stretching on injury rates in sport

As our society becomes more sedentary, the importance of physical activity and sport has become perhaps even more important for public health. There are enormous benefits in regular exercise and sport including improvements in lean muscle mass, improved blood markers, enhanced respiratory capacity, reduced obesity and improved blood sugar.

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How to Limit the Effects of a Sedentary Lifestyle

Moving your body at least every half an hour could help to limit the harmful effects of desk jobs and other sedentary lifestyles, research has revealed. The study found that both greater overall time spent inactive in a day, and longer periods of inactivity were linked to an increased risk of death.

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Osteoporosis

In this blog post we will address the issue of Osteoporosis, looking at how it is measured, and what the recommendations are for Vitamin D, Exercise and sun exposure.

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Orthotics and the treatment of patellofemoral pain

Patellofemoral pain syndrome or pain arising from the front of the knee is common in both athletes and the non-athletic population. One survey of over 2000 runners presenting to a sports medicine Centre it accounted for 19% of running injuries. It is present in as much as 25% of the general nonathletic population and although it occurs in all age groups is more common during adolescence and young adults.

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How to Manage a Lumbar Herniated Discs

It is common in clinical practice to be faced with patients who have indications that they have a lumbar herniated disc. This is often accompanied by nerve root compression and significant pain particularly pain, pins and needles and numbness. This is a common problem, but in spite of this understanding of the cause and treatment options is still poor in the community and in some parts of the medical profession and allied health.

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The Next Evolutionary Phase in Unweighted Rehab - Alter G

Unweighted rehab has traditionally been accomplished through aquatic therapy (pool time) or harness systems. Unweighting can be useful in the rehabilitation of various mala- dies. The technique allows earlier and more intensive active exercise therapy before patients are ready for full weightbearing.

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Anterior Cruciate Injuries in Children and Teenagers

Over the last two decades the number of ACL injuries amongst children and adolescents has increased by 2.3% per year. The ACL is an important ligament, and provides stability to the knee in situations which involve rotation and hyper-extension. The stability provides protects the meniscus and joint surfaces. Any damage to a meniscus in the knee can increase joint contact stresses by up to 500% and in many cases can be a predisposing factor for osteoarthritis later in life. Osteoarthritic changes are often seen at 10 years post injury.

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Promoting improved clinical and business outcomes through work-based learning

It is well recognised in practice and in the literature Eraut (1998) that a formal education and training provide only a small part of the preparation for work. This is evident with healthcare, in allied health, where Physiotherapy achieve the technical competency for a qualification, yet present to work lacking both technical skills and higher order transferrable skills.

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Knee Injury Prevention in Football

Knee injuries constitute a serious problem in many team field based sports but are especially common in football due to the 360 degree nature of the sport. In Football the sport involves sudden change of directions, pivoting/cutting, accelerations/decelerations and jumping/landing which are all common mechanisms for knee injuries.

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Should articular cartilage lesions with ACL ruptures be treated at Recontruction

This review looks at 2 papers, one from Northern Europe in 2015, and one from North America in 2015. Articular cartilage damage often occurs at the time of ACL injury and whether to treat this or not has never been clearly established. Using micro fracture of the subchondral bone proposes to induce a fibrocartilaginous healing of the defect, but its efficacy is unclear. These reviews look at 2 papers.

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Anterior Cruciate Injuries are frequently associated with fractures

This study in the Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy evaluated the contact and shear forces during nine weight-bearing exercises. Most of the studied functional exercises are commonly used in lowly rehabilitation. Estimated loading on the tibia femoral and patellofemoral joints can then be used to great different exercises and provide insights for the staging of rehabilitation programs following the injury or surgical intervention. During rehabilitation, the challenge is to protect the joint structures from excessive forces, while providing sufficient stimuli to regain muscle control and strength to restore normal function.

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Exercise & PCOS

Abstract: Polycystic ovary (ovarian) syndrome (PCOS) is a common disorder affecting 12-18% of Australian reproductive-aged women and up to 21% in high risk groups. PCOS can affect women of all shapes and sizes.

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Knee Injury Prevention in Football

Knee injuries constitute a serious problem in many team field based sports but are especially common in football due to the 360 degree nature of the sport. In Football the sport involves sudden change of directions, pivoting/cutting, accelerations/decelerations and jumping/landing which are all common mechanisms for knee injuries.

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Tips for Sedentary Workers

Research published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine concluded that office workers spent between 65% and 75% of their working hours sitting down, with half sedentary for long periods.

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Achilles Tendon Rupture

The Achilles tendon is the largest and strongest tendon in the body. It connects the calf muscle to the heel. It is placed under stress with every step we take and must withstand stresses of many times body weight when we run, push-off or jump.

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Ligament Injuries to the Thumb

Ligaments are soft tissue structures that attach bones together, and in so doing support the join or joint between these bones. The term ligament sprain means that the ligament fibres are disrupted and is synonymous with ligament tear.

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TFCC Tear

This is an injury that affects the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) that sits between the ulna and radius in the wrist.

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Bakers Cyst

A Baker’s Cyst is swollen semimembranosus gastrocnemius bursa. Synovial bursae are sacs that generally occur near our joints and sometimes communicate with the joint cavity. They typically sit at sites of anatomical friction and are designed to reduce friction. A swollen and painful bursae is known as a bursitis or bursopathy and can result from a number of causes.

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Iliotibial Band (ITB) Friction Syndrome | Leg Injury

ITB is an abbreviation for the “iliotibial band” which is a strong, flat tendon-like structure which connects the muscles of the hip to the outside of the lower leg. Friction occurs as the lower part of the ITB rubs over the lateral femoral epicondyle. If the ITB is tight and the rubbing becomes repetitive, increased friction will result causing irritation of the band and the bursa (a fluid filled sac) which sits between the band and the underlying surface. The band often rubs over the bony prominence at around 30 degrees of knee flexion.

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Avulsion Fracture

This is a fracture that occurs at the attachment sites of both ligaments and bone pulls away from the attachment site of the soft tissue.

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Medial Collateral Ligament Injuries

Medial Collateral Ligament injuries occur when the knee is being stressed towards the inside – into a knock kneed position – either via non-contact (running/stepping resulting in the knee being twisted) or contact scenarios (an opponent in sport falling onto the outside of the knee).

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De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

There are several tendons in the thumb. Two of these (abductor pollicus longus, and the extensor pollicus brevis) sit within a common sleeve (known as a tendon sheath). Overuse of these tendons will create an inflammation of the tendon sheath via excessive friction where the tendons emerge from the sheath.

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Nerve Root Compression more info

Nerve Root Compression is a common condition that affects these nerves. It can affect any level of the spine but is more common in the lumbar and cervical spine. The compression is usually the direct result of an acute disc bulge or some bony overgrowth or both leading to a compression of the nerve near these foramina.

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Stress Fracture of the Lumbar Spine

Bone is a metabolically active tissue that undergoes continuous resorption and renewal. Stress on the bone accelerates this process. When the process of renewal is not able to keep up with the process of bone resorption a stress fracture can form.

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Osgood Schlatters Disease

This is a stress injury to the bony attachment of the patellar tendon (see fig 1). It is caused by repeated stress on the growth plate of the bone from activities such as running, jumping and kicking. It usually occurs in active adolescents between the ages of 11 and 15 years and presents with pain and swelling over the front of the knee fig 2 below the knee cap, at the top of the tibia.

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